Stapedectomy / Exploratory tympanotomy & Ossiculoplasty

Septoplasty / Rhinoplasty
January 25, 2018
Tonsillectomy
January 25, 2018

Stapedectomy / Exploratory tympanotomy & Ossiculoplasty

What is a Stapedectomy / Exploratory tympanotomy & Ossiculoplasty?

Tympanotomy is a surgical procedure performed to drain an infected middle ear.
Stapedectomy is a surgical procedure to remove part of the fixed bone in the middle ear and then replace it with an artificial piston which will restore movement to the chain of bones in the middle ear.


My anaesthetic

This procedure will require an anaesthetic. See About your anaesthetic information sheet for information about anaesthetic and the risks involved. If you have any concerns, discuss these with your doctor.

If you have not been given an information sheet, please ask for one.

What are the risks of this specific procedure?

There are risks and complications with this procedure. They include but are not limited to the following:

General risks:
  • Infection can occur, requiring antibiotics and further treatment.
  • Bleeding could occur and may require a return to the operating room. Bleeding is more common if you have been taking blood thinning drugs such as Warfarin, Asprin, Clopidogrel (Plavix or Iscover) or Dipyridamole (Persantin or Asasantin).
  • Small areas of the lung can collapse, increasing the risk of chest infection. This may need antibiotics and physiotherapy.
  • Increased risk in obese people of wound infection, chest infection, heart and lung complications, and thrombosis.
  • Heart attack or stroke could occur due to the strain on the heart.
  • Blood clot in the leg (DVT) causing pain and swelling. In rare cases part of the clot may break off and go to the lungs.
  • Death as a result of this procedure is possible.
Specific risks:
  • Total loss of hearing (complete and irreversible loss of hearing in the operated ear ie. dead ear). This is usually due to complications arising during the course of the operation but may also occur during the early or late post-op period despite the operation being eventful.
  • Partial loss of hearing where the hearing is worse after the operation. This is usually due to complications arising during the course of the operation but may also occur during the early or late post-op period despite the operation being uneventful.
  • Failure to improve hearing, where there is no improvement in hearing after the operation. This may occur despite the operation being uneventful but may also be due to another disease process involving the bones in the middle ear.
  • Altered sensation of taste. The nerve carrying taste fibres to the same side of the tongue may need to be devided (cut) or stretched to obtain access to the stapes bone resulting in an altered taste which may be temporary or permanent.
  • Ringing in the ear (tinnitus). Otosclerosis is often associated with tinnitus. In some cases the tinnitus may be worse after surgery and may be temporary or permanent.
  • Dizziness or imbalance may occur and may be temporary or permanent.
  • Facial nerve palsy. Temporary or permanent paralysis of the muscles of the face may rarely occur.
  • Perforation of the tympanic membrane (ear drum) may rarely occur and may require further surgery to repair the perforation.

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