Laryngoscopy / Microlaryngoscopy

Insertion of Grommets
January 25, 2018
Meatoplasty
January 25, 2018

Laryngoscopy / Microlaryngoscopy

What is a laryngoscopy / microlaryngoscopy?

Laryngoscopy / microlaryngoscopy is the examination of the larynx (voice box). The examination is to detect any abnormalities. The removal or biopsy of any abnormal tissue may also be performed if abnormal tissue is present.

My anaesthetic

This procedure will require an anaesthetic. See About your anaesthetic information sheet for information about anaesthetic and the risks involved. If you have any concerns, discuss these with your doctor.

If you have not been given an information sheet, please ask for one.

What are the risks of this specific procedure?

There are risks and complications with this procedure. They include but are not limited to the following:

General risks:
  • Infection can occur, requiring antibiotics and further treatment.
  • Bleeding could occur and may require a return to the operating room.
  • Small areas of the lung can collapse, increasing the risk of chest infection. This may need antibiotics and physiotherapy.
  • Death as a result of this procedure is possible.
Specific risks:
  • Injury to the lips, teeth, gums or tongue. Dental injury may result in teeth being chipped, broken or dislodged. Crowns may also be dislodged.
  • Swelling of the tissue of the airway. This may lead to difficulty breathing, requiring the insertion of a breathing tube through the mouth and support with breathing until the swelling resolves. Rarely, a tracheostomy (insertion of breathing tube through the neck) may be required.
  • Bleeding into the airway. This may lead to difficulty breathing, requiring the insertion of a breathing tube through the mouth, until the bleeding is controlled. Rarely, a tracheostomy (insertion of breathing tube through the neck) may be required.
  • Collapsed lung (Pneumothorax). A small hole in the surface of the lung. Air then leaks from the lung, causing the lung to collapse. The lung may come back up itself, or a tube may need to be put into the chest through the skin to remove the air from around the lung. This may need a longer hospital stay.
  • Voice change. The larynx (voice box) or the nerves controlling the larynx may be injured by the instruments used for the microlaryngoscopy. Voice change may also result from excision or biopsy of the abnormal tissue in the larynx. The voice change may be persistent and not respond to further treatment.
  • Persistence or recurrence of the original disease may occur.
  • Undiagnosed neck/spinal problems.

Comments are closed.